Texas Air & Space Museum

Aviators of the past remembered,
aviators of the future inspired.

 

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Outdoor Exhibits - T-33A Shooting Star

 

The Lockheed T-33 T-bird is an American-built jet trainer aircraft. It was produced by Lockheed and made its first flight in 1948 piloted. The T-33 was developed from the Lockheed P-80/F-80 starting as TP-80C/TF-80C in development, then designated T-33A. It was used by the U.S. Navy initially as TO-2 then TV-2, and after 1962, T-33B. Despite its vintage the T-33 remains in service worldwide.

 

 

 

Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star (in transit to museum)

 

The T-33 (aka "T-Bird" or "Converter," since it converted fuel into noise) was developed from the Lockheed P-80/F-80 by lengthening the fuselage by slightly over three feet and adding a second seat, instrumentation and flight controls. It was initially designated as a variant of the P-80/F-80, the TP-80C/TF-80C.

Design work for the Lockheed P-80 began in 1943 with the first flight on 8 January 1944. Following on the Bell P-59, the P-80 became the first jet fighter to enter full squadron service in the United States Army Air Forces. As more advanced jets entered service, the F-80 took on another role - training jet pilots. The two-place T-33 jet was designed for training pilots already qualified to fly propeller-driven aircraft.

Originally designated the TF-80C, the T-33 made its first flight on 22 March 1948 with US production taking place from 1948 to 1959. The US Navy used the T-33 as a land-based trainer starting in 1949. It was designated the TV-2, but was redesignated the T-33B in 1962. The Navy operated some ex-USAF P-80Cs as the TO-1, changed to the TV-1 about a year later. A carrier-capable version of the P-80/T-33 family was subsequently developed by Lockheed, eventually leading to the late 1950s to 1970s T2V-1/T-1A SeaStar. A total of 6,557 Shooting Stars were produced, 5,691 by Lockheed.

 

from Wikipedia

 

Our aircraft is not a flyer and is presently in the process of being delivered to the museum by truck.

 

Click below to see 1 minute 10 second video of a Lockheed T-33 in flight.

 

 

Additional military and civilian aircraft may be seen at the Texas Air & Space Museum.

 

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